“Everyone in This Room Will Someday Be Dead ” by Emily Austin – Review

By: Angie Haddock


Gilda, a twenty-something lesbian, cannot stop ruminating about death. Desperate for relief from her panicky mind and alienated from her repressive family, she responds to a flyer for free therapy at a local Catholic church, and finds herself being greeted by Father Jeff, who assumes she’s there for a job interview. Too embarrassed to correct him, Gilda is abruptly hired to replace the recently deceased receptionist Grace.

Goodreads


This one came out earlier this year, and immediately intrigued me. I’m not one to ruminate about death too much myself, but the idea of a lesbian atheist pretending to be Catholic was too funny for me to pass up.

Like with “The Midnight Library,” the only complaints I’d seen online about this one were about how depressing the lead character is. So, if you’re not in the mood for that, don’t pick this one as your next read.

Admittedly, Gilda is weird. And depressed. She goes for long periods of time without washing a single dish or cup in her apartment, until they’re stacked so high they end up toppling over. She sits on the edges of bridges while contemplating death. There are a lot of reasons to be worried about this character’s well-being.

But she’s a good person at heart, and I’d even say she’s probably an overly sensitive person who sees/feels everything going on around her. She is worried that her younger brother drinks too much, and angry that her parents don’t see it. She is worried about a neighborhood cat that has gone missing.

She takes a job at a Catholic church, replacing the old secretary who passed away – and is concerned for her friends who will miss her, even though Gilda herself never met the deceased.

But her time at the church was amusing to me, a practicing Catholic. She contemplates religion as a whole, and some of the specific practices she learns while at her job. Some quotes that made me laugh out loud:

“Organ music reminds me more of Halloween and demons that it does of heaven and cherubs.”

“I bet that baby would be absolutely baffled to hear why she’s enduring this. Imagine someone forced you to wear a miniature wedding gown, dunked you underwater in front of an audience of your loved ones, and then explained that their rationale for doing so was so that when you die your spirit would fly to the clouds. If I were this baby, my first words would be ‘fuck off.'”

So, yea, entertaining observations such as these are why I enjoyed this book, despite a lot of it being a bit morbid.


Processing…
Success! You're on the list.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: