“The Lesbiana’s Guide to Catholic School” by Sonora Reyes – Review

By: Angie Haddock


Seventeen-year-old Yamilet Flores prefers drawing attention for her killer eyeliner, not for being the new kid at a mostly white, very rich, Catholic school. But at least here no one knows she’s gay, and Yami intends to keep it that way. After being outed by her crush and ex-best friend, she could use the fresh start.

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This book has a lot going on, and it starts going in ways I didn’t expect at only about a third of the way into it! Per the author’s own note, though, there are trigger warnings for racism, homophobia, and suicidal ideation.

Our main character is Yamilet, who lives with her mom and her younger brother, Cesar. Her dad, who she was very close to, was deported to Mexico when she was ten years old.

When we meet them, Yami and Cesar are about to start a new school year at a new school. Obviously, this always comes with some nervousness… but moreso for Yami, who is gay but not out. In addition to that, she feels like she is poorer than most kids at the private school, and she’s one of very few non-white kids there. Her initial goal is to just stay out of trouble, but that doesn’t last long.

On her first day, she has a class with Bo, an Asian girl who is out and pretty bold about it. This confuses Yamilet, because on one hand she wants to befriend Bo and learn more about her… but on the other, can she do that without outing herself?

So, this brings up an interesting aspect of the book. In so many ways, it’s easier for people of all ages to be “out” now than in previous decades, but that doesn’t mean it’s equally easy for everyone. Of course, the religious nature of her new school is a deterrent, as is the fact that her mom is religious and makes gay jokes. With their dad already deported, Yami and Cesar also have a healthy fear of police or authorities of an “official” variety. There are a lot of reasons these kids want to protect the various identities that they see as being different from their classmates.

I don’t want to give away too much, but a lot happens during the course of the school year. Yamilet definitely gets closer to Bo, and learns that, even though she is more confident about her sexuality, she has her own struggles with her ethnic heritage. She also, unexpectedly, makes a friend of a popular jock who starts the year with a crush on her. She learns some unexpected things about her brother, clashes with a parent, and of course ends up becoming more confident in who she is.

This was such a good book. While I don’t share all of the heroine’s identities, I did switch from public to Catholic school – and that alone was intimidating! Yami and Cesar have so many other issues on their plates, and I really sympathized with them.

This YA novel comes out today, May 17th, from Harper Collins. I was able to read an advanced copy through Books Forward, and through Netgalley.

According to The Trevor Project, LGBTQ youth are more than four times as likely to attempt suicide than their peers. If you are struggling and need to talk to someone, their site has resources for you. If you are in Nashville, please see the Oasis Center for local support.


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“The Guncle” by Steven Rowley – Review

By: Angie Haddock



Patrick, or Gay Uncle Patrick (GUP, for short), has always loved his niece, Maisie, and nephew, Grant. But in terms of caretaking and relating to two children, no matter how adorable, Patrick is honestly a bit out of his league… when tragedy strikes, Patrick finds himself suddenly taking on the role of primary guardian. Quickly realizing that parenting—even if temporary—isn’t solved with treats and jokes, Patrick’s eyes are opened to a new sense of responsibility, and the realization that, sometimes, even being larger than life means you’re unfailingly human.

Goodreads


This is the third novel by Steven Rowley, and it came out this spring. His first, “Lily and the Octopus,” had me bawling in my car at the end. (Hint: it’s great on audio, but maybe not while driving a car.) After that, I considered myself a dedicated fan.

This one did not disappoint. Patrick is a former TV star who has been out of the limelight – and LA – for a handful of years now. He’s suddenly thrust into the role of caretaker for his niece and nephew while their dad is in rehab. It’s their summer break, so there’s no school or anything like that to distract them. What a perfect time for them to spend 3 months at Patrick’s house, right? With his pool, maid, and gay neighbors.

The kids are already reeling from the recent loss of their mother, and not totally understanding where their dad had to run off to. So, initially, Patrick just tries to keep them distracted with fun. He orders pool floats and bikes, introduces them to the wonder of brunch, and eventually even gets a dog.

People sometimes question why Patrick is “hiding” in Palm Springs, and not pursuing new work in LA. Patrick has also suffered a major loss – although it was years ago – and perhaps he isn’t really over it. Eventually, he and the kids learn to face their grief together.

And yes, I cried again. (For those who’ve read it – it was the cake scene.)

The kids also teach him about Youtube. And start a little spark in him that eventually leads him back into the world of a working actor.

Since it takes place in the summer – and a lot of it takes place poolside – I’d consider this a great summer read. But the heart of the story can be appreciated anytime.


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